Monday, January 11, 2010

The Magnificent World Of ERTE

"Look at me, I'm in another world - a dream world that invites oblivion. People take drugs to achieve such freedom from their daily cares. I've never taken drugs. I've never needed them. I achieve a high through work." - ERTE

I came across this amazing artist during my youth and he became one of my earliest inspiration. His wondrous & colorful illustrations mesmerizes me as I stroll each & every page of them...full of opulence & decadence.

I've learn that before Erte, women were stuck in typical Victorian Era clothing such as voluminous skirts, corsets, button up boots & high neck collars. It took some vision to change that! The way Erte viewed women, drew them, envisioned and sculpted them, made me believe that I was born in the wrong decade!


Erte was born Romain de Tirtoff in St. Petersburg Russian and became one of the the twentieth century's foremost fashion and stage designers. For 22 years contributed fashion drawings to Harper's Bazaar, he became famous for extravagant costumes and stage sets of the Folies-Bergère in Paris and George White's Scandals in New York. In 1925 spending a brief period at Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer in Hollywood, he designed for opera and theatre.

The 40s and 50s were a relative period of obscurity for Erté. But the 60s found a new and enthusiastic market, and the artist responded by creating a series of colorful lithographic prints and sculpture,which exceeded the supply. It was a spectacular success in New York and London exhibitions of gouache paintings and drawings.


Erte died in April 1990 at the age of ninety-seven brought an end to a career of extraordinary brilliance and success.


4 comments:

Rachel said...

I love his work. Thank you for introducing me to him.

Maggie said...

Welcome Rachel!

His work can be viewed here ~ http://www.erte.com/

xoxoxo

ozma of odds said...

...so happy you received your art tags & I love your blog! xo

Maggie said...

Thank you Rosemary~~~ I like your blog as well...xoxoxo

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